An evaluation of SimVoice mental health de-escalation training

  • Genevieve Brook Department of Psychology, Carleton University, ON, Canada.
  • Miranda Elliott Department of Psychology, Carleton University, ON, Canada.
  • Craig Bennell Department of Psychology, Carleton University, ON, Canada.
Keywords: mental health training, training evaluation, police training, auditory hallucinations, person in crisis, police

Abstract

Systemic changes, such as the deinstitutionalization of mental health care, have increased the likelihood that people with acute mental health symptoms encounter the police. Given this, greater attention is being paid to mental health training for police officers in Canada. The current study presents a preliminary evaluation of SimVoice, a training tool that was designed to enhance the realism of de-escalation training for officers who may encounter individuals experiencing auditory hallucinations. Survey responses from trainees and trainers who took part in SimVoice training suggest the training is viewed very positively. Trainers felt that SimVoice was easy to use and contributed to realistic training, and they unanimously indicated they will continue using SimVoice as a training tool. Trainers and trainees both felt that the training was useful for developing general and specific knowledge and skills that would help officers more effectively manage encounters with people in crisis. Survey respondents also identified limitations when using SimVoice, along with suggestions for improving its use in training.

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Published
2022-12-15
How to Cite
BrookG., ElliottM., & BennellC. (2022). An evaluation of SimVoice mental health de-escalation training. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 7(4), 148-155. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.276
Section
Review(s)