Domestic and family violence behaviour change programs: An examination of gendered and non-gendered frameworks

  • Emily Boxhall Centre for Law & Justice, Charles Sturt University, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia.
  • Philip Birch School of International Studies & Education, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6517-5897
Keywords: Gendered violence, non-gendered violence, Duluth model, cognitive behaviour therapy, offender behaviour, treatment intervention

Abstract

This article sets out to examine the dichotomous frameworks used to inform domestic and family violence (DFV) behaviour change programs (BCPs). Based on a Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) methodology, we consider what works and what does not work in the delivery of Domestic and Family Violence programs through a gendered and non-gendered framework. This methodology was selected as it supports a balanced assessment of existing published research in the area, allowing for the current knowledge base to be critically examined. As a result, the REA revealed both the strengths and weaknesses of traditional gendered approaches focusing on the Duluth Model and non-gendered therapeutic approaches focusing on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT). Yet, while strengths and weaknesses can be seen in both the “violence as gendered” and “violence as non-gendered” paradigms, a case is made for only delivering BCPs within a non-gendered framework.

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Published
2022-06-16
How to Cite
BoxhallE., & BirchP. (2022). Domestic and family violence behaviour change programs: An examination of gendered and non-gendered frameworks. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 7(2), 75-80. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.240
Section
Original Research