Criminality and crime control measures in selected train stations in Lagos, Nigeria

  • Usman Ojedokun Department of Sociology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  • Grace Adeoti Department of Sociology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
Keywords: Motivated offenders, rail transportation system, public transit stations, Nigeria Railway Corporation

Abstract

Crime is among the major problems negatively impacting the effective operation of the rail transportation system in Nigeria. Although considerable scholarly attention has been devoted to criminality in public transit stations, there is a paucity of empirical data on the occurrence of the problem within train station facilities. Thus, using routine activity theory as a guide, this study investigated criminality and crime control measures in selected train stations in Lagos, Nigeria. In-depth interview and key informant interview methods were primarily deployed to gather data from 20 train station officials and eight locomotive drivers selected using purposive sampling technique. Results showed that vandalism, pilfering of train station equipment, rooftop riding and ticket evasion were the most commonly recorded forms of crime in train stations in Lagos. Multiple situational and environmental factors, including the presence of abandoned equipment, lax security systems, the construction of train stations in residential neighbourhoods, and poorly illuminated environments were making train stations vulnerable to criminality. It is imperative for the Nigeria Railway Corporation to strengthen existing security architecture at train stations to effectively deter motivated offenders from viewing the public transportation hub as suitable sites for crime perpetration.

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Published
2022-06-16
How to Cite
OjedokunU., & AdeotiG. (2022). Criminality and crime control measures in selected train stations in Lagos, Nigeria. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 7(2), 81-85. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.232
Section
Original Research